AAPS
Twitter YouTube LinkedIn
Memoirs

« back to memoirs

Minot P. Fryer, M.D.
1915 - 2008

Dr. Minot P. Fryer, one in a line of renowned plastic surgeons at Barnes Hospital and the Washington University School of Medicine, died February 15, 2008 in Evansville, Ind. He was 92. Dr. Fryer practiced at Barnes Hospital and taught at the medical school for 35 years, retiring in 1981 as clinical professor of surgery. Originally from Willimantic, Conn., Dr. Fryer came here in the early 1940s after getting his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University. After serving with the Navy in World War II, Dr. Fryer returned to Barnes to finish his residency and became the protege of Dr. James Barrett Brown, a renowned plastic surgeon and himself a student at Washington U. of Dr. Vilray Blair, one of the founders of modern plastic surgery. Dr. Fryer became an expert in reconstructive and cosmetic surgery.

One of Dr. Fryer's sons, Edwin Fryer of Ladue, said Dr. Fryer was among an elite team of plastic surgeons who treated patients who had suffered severe burns from atomic bomb testing in Alamagordo, N.M. Among his 80 textbooks and papers on plastic surgery were several on burns from atomic exposure. Dr. Fryer also had a long association with DePaul Hospital, where he was the chief of surgery for two years.

He was a former president of the American Association of Plastic Surgeons and vice chairman of the American Board of Plastic Surgery. In recognition of his contributions to medicine, in 1971 he was given an honorary doctorate from Brown University, where he had got his undergraduate degree in 1936. Dr. Fryer moved to Evansville upon his retirement.

In addition to his son, among Dr. Fryer's survivors are his wife, Louise B. Whiting of Evansville; another son, Minot P. Fryer Jr.; two sisters, Harriet Huckins, and Mary Fletcher; and five grandchildren.

Quick Links
About
Membership
Annual Meeting
Awards
Publications
Pledge
 
Twitter YouTube LinkedIn