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89th Annual Meeting Abstracts

Utilizing PRP in Cartilage Preservation Sustains the Original Architecture
Eser Yuksel, MD1, Hande Yaxgan, MD1, Melvin Spire, MD2.
1Baylor College of Medicine, Division of Plastic Surgery, Houston, TX, USA, 2N/A, Snowmass Village, CO, USA.

The need for using banked cartilage is not rare following rhinoplasty. The conventional methods of storage media fails to keep the original resiliency and structural properties of the cartilage matrix. After our incidental observations regarding maintenance of the resiliency of the cartilage which is preserved in PRP (platelet rich plasma -80 C), we decided to execute a prospective study to compare the advantages of PRP preservation over saline.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Total of 15 patients’ excess cartilage harvested during rhinoplasty has been utilized for the study (10 septal and 5 conchal cartilage). Each patient’s cartilage has been separated in 4 samples of 1x10 mm strips.
Preservation environment is designed as three groups: A: saline (+4 C), B: saline (-80 C), C: PRP (-80 C) . One strip for each sample were utilized for initial analysis (zero time values, Group D). Table 1 shows the distribution of groups for septal and conchal cartilage. After three months of preservation the samples are evaluated in histological and mechanical properties. A tensilometer, which measures the reflected pressure and breaking threshold level, was used.
Chondrocyte morphology and quantity were compared, Matrix proteoglycan was measured with morphometric analysis.
RESULTS: Table 2 shows the quantitative measurements. In all parameters Group C and D showed statistically significant difference (P<0.05) from Group A and B. There was an insignificant difference between Groups A and B, and between Groups C and D.
CONCLUSION: Utilizing PRP as a storage media is a promising concept to preserve the original tissue architecture (matrix). Autologous cartilage banking can be a more dependable source for possible secondary requirements.


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