AAPS, American Association of Plastic Surgeons
AAPS, American Association of Plastic Surgeons
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2008 Annual Meeting Abstracts

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The Teaching Perspectives of Plastic Surgeons
Douglas J. Courtemanche, MD, MS, FRCSC, Peter A. Lennox, MD, FRCSC, John Collins, PhD.
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

PURPOSE: To evaluate the teaching perspectives of plastic surgeons using the Teaching Perspectives Inventory and compare the TPI of plastic surgeons with other university teachers and with surgeons in general.
METHODS: The teaching perspectives of 14 plastic surgeons teaching in one academic program were assessed using the Teaching Perspectives Inventory (TPI). This inventory assesses the perspectives of transmission, apprenticeship, development, nurturing and social reform. Each perspective is also evaluated with respect to the teachers belief, intention and action. Data for plastic surgeons was compared to that for greater than 50,000 university teachers in general and for 85 surgeons in general who have completed the TPI.
RESULTS: The dominant perspective was Apprenticeship and Transmission and Developmental also had high scores. Plastic surgeons were not different from University Teachers in general or surgeons who have completed the TPI, except for a relatively lower score for Social Reform.
Action sub-scores were higher than Belief and Intention sub-scores for Transmission, apprenticeship and Developmental perspectives, perhaps indicating an influence of the structure of residency training programs on teaching.
The CanMEDS roles of specialists in practice continue to be defined by the Royal College it becomes apparent that attention needs to be paid to all of the teaching perspectives. There is not a 1:1 match of the roles and the perspectives but a reflection on how the two systems can be used together to inform surgical resident teaching might be useful.
CONCLUSIONS: The general teaching perspectives of plastic surgeons are congruent with generally held views about teaching in a residency training program with an emphasis on the Apprenticeship nature of surgical training. Plastic surgeons do not differ greatly from university teachers or surgeons in general. Plastic surgeons do not seem to be as interested in individual or social change as university teachers in general. The teaching perspectives do not have a 1:1 correlation with the CanMEDS competencies. Reflection on how the TPI and CanMEDS systems can be used together to inform surgical resident teaching might be useful.


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